How Rimadyl Helps Dog Arthritis, Aches and Pains

How Rimadyl helps dog arthritis, aches and pains

Rimadyl is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that’s FDA-approved for use on dogs up to twice a day. Rimadyl is the commercial name for the drug carprofen, and it’s been used by more than 24 million dogs since 1996, according to its website. It’s a popular choice because many human painkillers, such as aspirin, can be lethal if given to dogs.

Since coming onto the market, Rimadyl has emerged as the No. 1 arthritis medication, being used more than all other canine NSAIDs combined. This medication can’t cure arthritis, aches or pain in dogs. Instead, it works as a pain reliever that can help dogs get back to normal and manage their pain.

How does Rimadyl work?

Rimadyl, or the generic carprofen drug Novox, works by inhibiting the function of enzymes that create inflammatory responses that can lead to joint pain and ache. Unlike other NSAIDs, which do the same things for humans, carprofen doesn’t deplete the blood supply of the kidneys, reduce platelet count or lead to ulcers in dogs.

When dogs take this drug once or twice daily as directed, they can return to their spry selves. Dogs can live many years with arthritis or joint pain, so it’s important to use this drug to give them some fun and movement back in their lives. Rimadyl has been proven safe to use over a long period of time, allowing your old friend to run, jump and chase for years without feeling the limiting pain of arthritis. Timothy Monroe, D.V.M., of the Northland Veterinary Hospital in Gouverneur, New York, told Rimadyl how he’s noticed a big improvement in the dogs he’s prescribed the drug to.

“It’s always rewarding when you can prescribe products that work well and help your patients,” Monroe said. “Rimadyl has done wonders for our older dog population, dogs that otherwise couldn’t jump on and off beds, and in and out of cars. Those dogs started to move again. It’s been quite remarkable. I think it’s done as much as any medication has in the last 20 years that I’ve been in practice here. I’m really pleased.”

Carprofen poisoning can be caused by overconsumption of the medication or improper use. This underscores the importance of using this medication as directed. Symptoms of poisoning include vomiting, bloody stool, lethargy and seizures, among others, Pet Poison Helpline explained.

Rimadyl may also have negative interactions if taken with steroid treatments such as prednisone. Phenobarbital also presents complications and may require more monitoring than normal, Veterinary Partner explained. ACE inhibitors may also be reduced in effectiveness when taken with Rimadyl.

Does your dog need Rimadyl?

​If you suspect your dog has canine arthritis, Rimadyl might be the solution for you. This medical condition is characterized by stiffness, joint pain, difficulty standing or jumping, lameness, barking when touched and other movement reluctantness or pain. Dogs who are overweight, older, or certain breeds such as Golden Retrievers are more likely to develop arthritis. Orthopedic injuries also predispose dogs to arthritis.

If you notice your dog fits any of these symptoms, talk to your veterinarian about using Rimadyl, exercise and diet to help manage these issues and get back to a normal life.

How can you get Rimadyl?

When your dog gets prescribed Rimadyl, it’s important to shop for the lowest price. Here are a few of the prices on Rimadyl from around the Internet.

  • 1-800-PetMeds sells 30 chewable tablets of 25 milligram Rimadyl for $37.99.
  • Doctors Foster and Smith sells 30 chewable tablets of 25 milligram Rimadyl for $32.70.
  • PetPlus sells 30 chewable tablets of 25 milligrams of Rimadyl for $28, and it sells Novox for only $15.

If your dog is in need of pain relief for arthritis or other joint or body pain, talk to your veterinarian about how Rimadyl can work for you.

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