Got a Dog That Won’t Quit? 4 Handy Tips to Get Them to Stop Jumping

Get your dog to stop jumping

Does your dog leap up for a hello when you walk through the front door? Do guests sometimes get knocked over when they stop by for a visit? Are the neighbors used to being greeted with two paws on their shoulders? If so, it’s probably time to teach your dog to stop jumping.

A jumping dog isn’t only annoying, they also aren’t showing you much respect, which means that they probably don’t see you as the pack leader. And you should be the pack leader if you want a well-balanced and obedient dog.

So how can you teach your dog to stop jumping? Here are 4 easy steps.

1. Assert Yourself as the Pack Leader

Whether you’re trying to teach your dog to stop jumping, to stop pulling ahead on walks, or to simply follow commands, you need to be the pack leader. The pack leader is calm, focused, and confident, they stand straight up and walk with their eyes forward, and they give cues — they don’t take them. Establishing yourself as the pack leader will make teaching your dog to stop jumping a lot easier.

RELATED STORY: How to Handle 6 Common Dog Behavior Problems

2. Don’t Encourage Jumping

If you greet your dog with a loud, animated voice and lots of affection when you arrive home, you’re encouraging excited behavior, which often includes jumping. The same is true for guests who come over or people who greet your dog when you’re out on a walk. When you arrive home, keep calm, and ask your guests and those greeting your dog to do the same.

3. Make Your Dog “Sit” Before They Can Say Hello

Your dog knows that if they jump on you or someone else, they’re going to get attention, whether it’s positive or negative (in the moment, it doesn’t make much difference to the dog). But you can teach your dog that there is another way to get attention: by sitting nicely. Teach your dog the “sit” command, and when you come home or have guests over, make your dog sit before anyone is allowed to pet them or give them attention. When your dog sits make sure you reward them with a treat and plenty of praise.

RELATED STORY: How to Calm Down a Dog

4. The Right Kind of Punishment

Jumping isn’t always about excitement or asserting dominance; sometimes it’s a way to release anxious energy. And yelling at your dog or shoving them off can actually make the problem worse. If you want to get your dog to stop jumping while it’s happening, simply turn your back, look away from the dog, or leave the room without any fanfair. Ask your guests to do the same. Your dog should eventually learn that jumping only means they’ll be ignored, and that’s the last thing they want.

Does your dog jump? Or have you gotten your dog to stop jumping? Leave a comment and tell us about it, and consider signing up for PetPlus. PetPlus is a benefit program for pet owners that provides member-only access to medications at wholesale prices, plus discounts on food, supplies, vet visits, boarding, and more. Learn more at PetPlus.com.

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