When Is The Best Time To Vaccinate Your Puppy

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Congratulations! You’ve brought an endless source of joy into your life by adopting a puppy. If this is your first rodeo, you might be a bit nervous about this big change that this can bring to your life. Although having a dog is always fun, make no mistake, it can also be a very big responsibility. In order to keep your dog healthy throughout his life, you need to start caring for his health from early childhood itself. That’s why it’s so important to give the right vaccinations at the right times.

When’s The Right Time To Vaccinate Your Puppy?
Take your new puppy to your veterinarian for a checkup at your earliest convenience. After the initial vaccination, your veterinarian will be able to determine which vaccinations were given to your puppy. If your vet is satisfied with the results, he will then schedule a series of follow-up vaccinations to keep your dog healthy.

The AAHA (American Animal Hospital Association) claims that puppies have to be vaccinated every three to four weeks when they are 6 to 16 weeks old. I.e., 8, 12, and 16 weeks, or at 6, 10, and 14 weeks. The final dosage should be given at the ages between 14 and 16 weeks. The typical vaccines that your puppy should receive are the adenovirus 2, canine parvovirus 2, and the canine distemper vaccines. The first time that your puppy is vaccinated against rabies should be along with the final set of puppy vaccines.

Here Is A Detailed Schedule Of The Typical Times A Regular Dog Should Be Vaccinated

  • 5 weeks – At this stage in his life, he should be vaccinated for the Parvovirus since puppies are especially susceptible to this virus.
  • 6 and 9 weeks – At this age, your puppy should be injected with a combination of different vaccines (as mentioned above), without leptospirosis.
  • 12 weeks and older – This is a very crucial time for your puppy. At this age, he should be vaccinated against rabies. Rabies is a fatal disease that can turn any loving dog into a vicious creature. Make sure you don’t skip out on this vaccine.
  • 12 to 15 weeks – It’s time for another combination vaccine. This time, leptospirosis is included in the vaccine pool. It should especially be included if you are traveling to another place where there is a high risk of acquiring leptospirosis. Same goes for vaccinations against Lyme disease.
  • Adult – When your puppy has grown into an adult, he just needs to receive booster shots. He needs a combination of vaccinations that include vaccines like rabies, Lyme disease, and leptospirosis.

Remember that in some rare cases, despite vaccination, your pet will still somehow get the disease. This can be because of an immune system failure and has nothing to do with the vaccines themselves.

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