Play This Song to Your Cat – You Wont Believe What Happens!

One researcher at the University of Wisconsin has decided to create music for an unusual audience: cats.

Charles Snowdon, Ph.D., is a professor of psychology and zoology and he’s working with his colleagues at the university to make music for felines that involves their natural noises and rhythms such as purring and high-pitched noises. Below is an example of Snowdon’s experimental cat music. If you have a cat, take a listen and see how they react.

Cat tunes

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Snowdon and his colleagues didn’t start this project just for fun, however. They were curious what cats think about music.

“We were motivated to make music for cats for two reasons,” Snowdon told The Huffington Post. “First, many pet owners told us that they play radio music for their pets while they are at work and we wondered if this had any value. Second, we have developed a theory that suggests that species other than humans can enjoy music but that the music has to be in the frequency range that the species uses to communicate and with tempos that they would normally use.”

Snowdon studied the effects of his music on nearly 50 cats and found that the cats preferred his custom-made tunes to classical music, according to Discovery News. Snowdon and his team observed the cats rub up against the speakers, act calmly and generally react positively to the cat music. He will publish the results in the scientific journal Applied Animal Behavioral Science.

Music for cats can soothe them and may have applications in real life as well. They could be used to help calm cats who are living at a shelter or other facility that may be scary and unfamiliar.

Other ways to calm your cat 

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Aside from music for cats, there are plenty of other ways you can help your feline relax and keep calm, even in the most stressful situations. Petfinder recommended that people spend a little time playing with their feline every night. It only takes a few minutes to play an active game with your beloved kitty, but it can exhaust them for the rest of the night. Giving your feline a chance to interact and expend some energy will allow them to relax and get some sleep.

Catster suggested that people talk to and touch their cat when they’re in the car to cut down on stress. Many felines freak out when they’re in a vehicle. This was one of the reasons that Snowdon studied music for cats. But Catster said even your voice and a warm touch can be a soothing reminder to your cat that everything is OK. It may feel weird talking to your cat at first, but they’re guaranteed to appreciate it.

Many pet parents turn to scented toys or pheromones that can help cats feel calmer, but often providing somewhere clean and comfortable is enough for a cat to relax and calm down. Soft blankets and scratching equipment are helpful additions to any cat space as well.

Use your PetPlus membership to save on food, supplements and medication that your beloved cat may need to keep calm and meow on.

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